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Difference between revisions of "AnnotateEdTech (November 16, 2020)"

 
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November 16, 2020
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November 16, 2020, 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Mountain Time  
10 a.m. Mountain Time
 
  
\#AnnotateEdTech
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[https://cuboulder.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEqcu2tqDMqHtzPLPUBcK0rO0B1MNTYOv2P Register here]
  
Details TBA!
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An educational technology company's website can reveal how the company understands the purposes of education. Companies construct narratives about students and teachers, as well as learning and teaching, in order to sell their product. Companies also often market their product with claims about their technology's efficacy while offering scant evidence to support those claims. Pushed by companies and their salespeople, the claims are reproduced by schools, colleges, and universities when explaining why decision makers purchased the technology or why teachers, students, and staff should - or must - use the technology.
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What if those decision makers had to contend with questions, observations, and evidence that troubled the narratives presented by educational technology companies? That's what we aim to do when we convene for #AnnotateEdTech: to use social annotation in order to critique the language educational technology companies use to frame education and the ways they insist their technology can help.
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We'll use the social annotation tool [https://web.hypothes.is/ Hypothesis] to engage in a close reading of one or more online proctoring companies' websites. After annotating the site(s), we'll discuss what we noticed and how we might use our analysis to make change in our individual contexts.
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Please [https://cuboulder.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEqcu2tqDMqHtzPLPUBcK0rO0B1MNTYOv2P complete the Zoom RSVP] to join the conversation. You will receive more details prior to the event.

Latest revision as of 18:11, 2 November 2020

November 16, 2020, 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. Mountain Time

Register here


An educational technology company's website can reveal how the company understands the purposes of education. Companies construct narratives about students and teachers, as well as learning and teaching, in order to sell their product. Companies also often market their product with claims about their technology's efficacy while offering scant evidence to support those claims. Pushed by companies and their salespeople, the claims are reproduced by schools, colleges, and universities when explaining why decision makers purchased the technology or why teachers, students, and staff should - or must - use the technology.


What if those decision makers had to contend with questions, observations, and evidence that troubled the narratives presented by educational technology companies? That's what we aim to do when we convene for #AnnotateEdTech: to use social annotation in order to critique the language educational technology companies use to frame education and the ways they insist their technology can help.


We'll use the social annotation tool Hypothesis to engage in a close reading of one or more online proctoring companies' websites. After annotating the site(s), we'll discuss what we noticed and how we might use our analysis to make change in our individual contexts.


Please complete the Zoom RSVP to join the conversation. You will receive more details prior to the event.