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Edit-a-Thon (October 24, 2019)

Revision as of 23:48, 3 October 2019 by Autumm (talk | contribs) (updated link to conference preso)

#StudentPrivacyStatement October 24th, 2019, 2pm Eastern/11am Pacific

Join a zoom call and edit session around the idea of a student privacy statement. In a recent Domains19 conference presentation and EDUCAUSE Review article Autumm Caines and Erin Rose Glass proposed the idea of a statement to be placed in the syllabus encouraging students to ask questions about how their data is used in learning systems. From the article:


"...Educators cannot sit on the sidelines when it comes to the issues surrounding students and data privacy. Our larger point is to ask educators to make a statement, be it in the syllabus or otherwise, about the need to educate students on these matters. Other ways to do so [besides placing a statement in the syllabus] might be to create an assignment or even an entire course that addresses these issues, bring these issues to a curriculum committee, inquire about the use of data on campus, and/or request professional development opportunities related to addressing data privacy concerns.

We invite educators to share their adaptations of the syllabus statement, or other ways they are provoking the discussion about data privacy education, on Twitter with the hashtag #StudentPrivacyStatement so that we can learn how others are choosing to address these issues. We will be engaging with this hashtag after the first week of publication and hosting an open video conference via Zoom as part of Ethical EdTech edit-a-thon on October 24, 11:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. (Pacific)."

Agenda

  • 60 min: Videoconference introduction on Zoom
  • 60 min: Edit-a-thon
    • Independent or Group Contribution,

Recommended Reading/Watching


Proposed Syllabus Draft Statement


Your personal data is valuable and important, which is why it is often collected by the digital tools you use in your educational activities. To better understand how and why your data is collected, the potential risks of this collection, and how to better protect your personal data, consider asking yourself the following questions:


* What types of personal data do you think are collected through your use of digital tools for educational activities?

* What value does your personal data have for different contexts and entities? Consider how your data might be valued by your instructor, the institution, yourself, and companies.

* Who owns your personal data, who can sell it, and who can use it?

* Do you have concerns about how your personal data can be used? If so, what are they?

* Are there aspects of your identity or life that you feel would put you in a place of special vulnerability if certain data were known about you or used against you?

If after asking yourself these questions you have concerns, I invite you to reach out to me to discuss them. I may not have easy answers to the questions or concerns that you bring to me (often in these matters no one has these answers), but I will happily explore them further with you or find someone more knowledgeable who can help answer your questions.

RSVP

If you can make it, edit this section and add your name below. (You'll need to log in or create an account first. Check your spam folder if you don't receive an account confirmation.)

Edit-a-thon results